Resources

The following printed materials were used as sources of information for these web pages.

  • Brooks, Courtney, Grimwood, James, and Swenson, Lloyd. Chariots for Apollo: A History of Manned Lunar Spacecraft. NASA, 1979. NASA SP-4205. Available online at the NASA History Office web site.

  • Cernan, Eugene and Davis, Don. The Last Man on the Moon. St Martin's Press, 1999. ISBN 0-312-19906-6. Available at Amazon.com.

  • Collins, Michael. Carrying the Fire. Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1974. Available at Amazon.com.

  • Chambers, Joseph R. and Chambers, Mark A. Emblems of Exploration, Logos of the NACA and NASA, Monographs in Aerospace History, no.56, 2015. Available from NASA as a PDF.

  • Cooper, Gordon. Leap of Faith. Harper Collins, 2000. Available at Amazon.com.

  • Cunningham, Walter, with Herskowitz, Mickey. The All-American Boys. Macmillan Co., 1977. New edition available at Amazon.com.

  • Duke, Charles and Duke, Dotty. Moonwalker. Oliver Nelson, 1990. ISBN 0-8407-9106-2

  • Ezell, Edward and Ezell, Linda. The Partnership: A History of the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project. NASA, 1978. NASA SP-4209. Available online at the NASA History Office web site.

  • Farmer, Gene and Hamblin, Dora Jane. First on the Moon: A Voyage with Neil Armstrong, Michael Collins, Edwin E. Aldrin, Jr. Little, Brown, 1970.

  • Freas, Frank Kelly. Skylab Patchwork. Analog Science Fiction/Science Fact, June 1973, pp. 10-19.

  • Glenn, John, with Taylor, Nick. John Glenn: A Memoir. Bantam, 1999. ISBN 0-553-11074-8. Available at Amazon.com.

  • Glushko, Aleksandr. Design for Space: Soviet and Russian Mission Patches. Dom Publishers, Berlin, 2016. ISBN 978-3-86922-328-5 (English edition), ISBN 978-3-86922-389-6 (Russian edition)

  • Hamblin, Dora Jane. Spacecraft Anonymous. Life magazine, October 8, 1968, pp. 109-119. Available online.

  • Hengeveld, Ed. Apollo Vacuum Chamber Tests — Part 1: 2TV-1. Spaceflight magazine, March 2000, pp.127-130. Part 2: LTA-8. Spaceflight magazine, April 2000, pp.171-174.

  • Hengeveld, Ed. The Apollo Emblems of Artist Al Stevens. Spaceflight magazine, June 2008, pp. 220-225. Available online at collectSPACE.

  • Hitt, David; Garriott, Owen and Kerwin, Joseph. Homesteading Space, 2008. ISBN 0-8032-2434-6. Available at Amazon.com.

  • Kaplan, Judith and Muniz, Robert. Space Patches: From Mercury to the Space Shuttle. Sterling Publishing Co., Inc., New York. 1986. ISBN 0-8069-6294-1

  • Kircher, Travis. More Than Just a Merit Badge. Ad Astra magazine, Nov/Dec 2000, pp. 23-25. Also available online at collectSPACE.

  • Kozloski, Lillian. U.S. Space Gear: Outfitting the Astronaut. Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, D.C., 1994. ISBN 0-87474-459-8

  • Kranz, Gene. Failure Is Not an Option. Simon and Schuster, 2000. ISBN 0-7432-0079-9. Available at Amazon.com.

  • Lattimer, Dick. All We Did Was Fly to the Moon. The Whispering Eagle Press, Gainesville, FL. ISBN 0-9611228-0-3 This book is the ultimate reference for anyone interested in space mission patches. Lattimer has performed the groundwork of getting the story behind most patch designs. A great many of the quotes on this site are from this book. Available at many science museum gift shops, as well as online bookstores such as Amazon.com.

  • Meuser, Philipp. Galina Balashova: Architect of the Soviet Space Program. Dom Publishers, Berlin, 2015. ISBN 978-3-86922-355-1

  • Murray, Charles and Cox, Catherine Bly. Apollo, The Race to the Moon. Simon and Schuster, 1989. ISBN 0-671-61101-1

  • Slayton, Donald K. and Cassutt, Michael. Deke! Forge, 1994. ISBN 0-312-85918-X. Available at Amazon.com.

  • Southwell, David. Once-Lost 'Apollo' Mural Graces Astronauts' Eatery. Chicago Sun-Times, 8 June 1999.

  • Still, Russell. Relics of the Space Race. Third edition, 2001. This excellent book provides a wealth of data on the manufacture of space mission patches. According to Still, the primary sources for embroidered patches were AB Emblems and Lion Brothers; but it's a much more involved story than that, and Still follows the trail. Information on this book can be found at the collectSPACE web site. According to Still's web site, this book is now out of print. And I'm guessing that he's found other writing projects that are more interesting to him than a fourth edition.
  • Wilson, Keith. The First US Astronaut Crew Patches. Spaceflight magazine, May 1996, pp.172-173. A discussion of Gemini crew patches.

Patch Information on the Web

  • Without doubt, the best online resource for patch collectors is Chris Spain's Crew Patches web site. Chris has done a terrific job of researching the various versions of patches. If you collect patches, it is an essential reference. Believe me. Just go there right now.

  • Jacques van Oene has a terrific Space Patch website. He's gathered significant information to supplement what's found in Lattimer. He seems to specialize in "unofficial" patches, and authored (with Bert Vis) an article on the subject which was published in the March 1999 issue of the British Interplanetary Society's Spaceflight magazine. His site site attempts to cover patches for all manned spaceflights, up to the present day. Check it out.

  • The CollectSpace site has a forum for discussing patches. All the past discussions are archived, which makes it a tremendous resource.

  • Ed Hengeveld's article on Al Stevens' patches was based on the work of collector Noah Bradley, whose fascinating Lunar Archive blog includes further examples of Stevens' work. .

  • Les Badges du Cosmos is (despite the excruciatingly annoying wiggling titles) a really good resource for non-US patches. Site navigation is a little obscure, but it's well worth exploring.

  • Johnson Space Center's Imagery Services has a Digital Image Collection which includes "official" images of mission patches. The scans are, sadly, not all that great. For quality digital images, I recommend the Project Apollo Archives, also cited below.

  • I'm thrilled to report that the NASA History Division now is a terrific resource for patch images. Curiously (and somewhat painfully) the thumbnail images are based on the dreadful images they used to host. And -- to my intense frustration -- they perpetuate the myth of pre-Gemini 5 patches by providing images of the simply awful bogus patches for the Mercury and Gemini 3 and 4 flights. The History Division! For shame!

General Spaceflight Information Sources

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